Midlands Classic Pubs #7: Queens Head Inn Hinckley

One of the things bloggers spend far too much time doing is looking at stats.  Of course like match stats they can be completely irrelevant as I appear to be picking up far more of a global audience these days.

However, as Birmingham’s victories this season have all pretty much occurred with an inferior amount of possession then all this proves is that there are lies, dammed lies and statistics.

According to my stats I’ve had readers from all over the globe this year, but I reckon the majority are cluttering up my spam filter offering me deals to ‘increase my social medial presence.’

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Nonetheless, there does appear to be a Canadian branch (Russ), American (Dick and Dave), Dutch (Paul) and Ireland, Cyprus, Norway, Malta and Hong Kong all appear on here often enough to potentially be reading this blog and not be asking me to swipe right (or is it left?) for an experience of a lifetime.

Which got me thinking, exactly which pub would I show them in the Midlands if I was going to offer them a traditional English boozer?

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On pubs I’ve visited I reckon I could do far worse than looking at Craven Arms (Birmingham), The New Inn (Peggs Green), King William (Milford), The Loggerheads (Shrewsbury), The Elms (Stapenhill) and The Cuckoo Bush (Gotham).

Another quintessential British pub that would fit the bill would be Hinckley’s 345 – Queens Head Inn LE10 1RJ.

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In a town that has its own Bass trail and is claiming birthrights of the master brewer along with some excellent Micros, this has been in the GBG since 2013 apparently.

I didn’t know this beforehand but it is easy to see why as it’s a classic Victorian free house with four rooms (there can’t be many four roomed boozers left) including a snug.

(that’s not a typo Russ)

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Bench seating, beautifully restored furniture and dating back to 1809 mean this place is a good starting point to bring anyone visiting their first British pub.

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A friendly gaffer who served me a classic half pint of excellently kept Bass

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and at around 5.45 on a Tuesday there was a good atmosphere in the bar with around 20 people in, a fire roaring and music on in the background that you’ve actually heard of.

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I believe the phrase is a multi-roomed, split level pub and whilst I didn’t visit the beer garden I’ve no doubt that was in top order as well.  Even the toilet has a classic plumbing system and was comfortably the smartest and cleanest I have been in this year.

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A worthy entrant in the newly created list of “Quintessential British pubs I would show people visiting for the first time,” (I might need to work on the catchiness of that title)and proves the Midlands still has some fantastic hostelries left.

(scratchy picture…but you get the idea)

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Any other suggestions for classic Midlands boozers?

20 thoughts on “Midlands Classic Pubs #7: Queens Head Inn Hinckley

  1. Looks a great little place. I was wondering why, on our previous canal visits to Hinckley, that we’d never visited this pub. Having looked at it on Google maps I can see that it is on the other side of the town centre to our walk from the canal. (Next time, hopefully we’ll walk a bit further!)
    However, looking on Streetview, I’m amazed to see that it is almost next door to another pub (the Black Horse) just separated by a florist’s shop. Remarkable that two pubs can survive so close together in this day and age.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Love this idea and I can confirm at least two people will use this list. I’ve only been in one of the pubs you list: Loggerheads. I am curious what you would say to places like the Beacon Hotel and Vine Inn? I can guess the Beacon doesn’t match up to being a boozer, but does the Vine?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love The Vine but not been there since I started blogging so I thought I’d just use those examples. I’m off to watch WBA v Blues in March so will probably tie it in with a Vine visit on matchday….I have to confess I’ve never been to the Beacon but heard a lot of positives about it. The Vine does match up and is now a desi style boozer so moving with the times whilst retaining its past.

      Like

  3. Another list of interest to a lot of us, while maybe a couple of us, would be towns that people don’t know about. An example would be Leek. I had never heard of it until RM mentioned it. You have mentioned places as well, but love those lists.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Greetings from Malta! I’m afraid your temptation of Bass won’t be getting me back to the UK anytime soon. Likewise Marston’s. And now I read Fullers have been un-independetised by a global mega-brand, although they aren’t owned by a totally massive global corporate like Bass!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “is that there are lies, dammed lies and statistics.”

    You nicked that from elsewhere. 😉

    “Which got me thinking, exactly which pub would I show them in the Midlands if I was going to offer them a traditional English boozer?”

    Good choice for a blog post.

    “(that’s not a typo Russ)”

    Give me some credit; I know what a snug is… pubwise at least. 🙂

    “mean this place is a good starting point to bring anyone visiting their first British pub.”

    It would definitely be my idea of a traditional pub.

    “who served me a classic half pint of excellently kept Bass”

    Decent lacings as well.

    “Even the toilet has a classic plumbing system”

    As opposed to those keg urinals. 🙂

    “A worthy entrant in the newly created list of “Quintessential British pubs I would show people visiting for the first time,””

    I like it! (the pub and the idea of said list)

    I think you’re on to something. 🙂

    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

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